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Working At Your Desk All Day






Does your working week consist of sitting at a desk, answering a phone and staring at a computer screen? When you get out of your chair at the end of a day, do you feel sore, stiff and aching? It’s no secret that desk jobs can wreak havoc on your body, especially on your back and neck.


For people who work jobs that require only light activity away from a desk, neck strains, slouching, and shoulder pain are an unfortunate reality. So how do you prevent these aches and pains without switching jobs?


For starters you can take a look at the position of your computer screen. Ideally, you should not have to bend your neck at all to look at the screen. If you use a laptop, connecting it to an eye-level monitor is a great idea. The added stress to your neck from being tilted to gaze at a traditional laptop screen can lead to permanent damage to your neck over time. The same goes for phone screens. Try to lessen the amount of time your neck is bent while texting or otherwise staring at your phone. For every degree that your neck is bent forward a surprising amount of weight is added onto your neck and our head weigh enough as it is. An adult human head weighs almost 5kgs!

Avoid the phone ‘neck-cradle’ while speaking on the phone. Our necks were not designed to be contorted into a severe enough angle to be able to hold a phone in place. Doing so can lead to pinched nerves, knotted muscles or even cause a “mini-stroke.” With the advent of Bluetooth headsets there is no need to ever do this.


But even after setting your chair at the right height, getting wrist-cushions for your keyboard and using a phone headset you can still suffer long-term strains and stresses on your body. Regular visits to your massage therapist can help alleviate the aches and pains you experience sitting at a desk all day. Massage can break up and lengthen the knotted muscles in your neck and shoulders, work out the strains in your forearms, hands and wrists and work on the knots at the base of your back. The bottom line is simple. Massages are crucial to office work wellness.